Thursday , 22 March 2018
Home » People » This is Me
This is Me

This is Me

Today, I did things a little differently.  There was no sudden urge to wake up and try to do ten thousand more things that I could not accomplish but would make me anxious anyway.  There was no mad dash to put in my contact lenses that give the false perception of perfect sight.  I was not rushing past the mirror after my shower; fearfully dreading the steam evaporating too quickly and forcing me to take in the visage of my less than perfect physicality.  The frantic search for my body shaper and the rush to heat my flat irons to straighten my naturally curly hair was utterly absent.

Today, I paused to glimpse my full form; one that was shaped by the inconsistencies of self-doubt, overeating, extreme physicality, multiple pregnancies and childbirths, and the stillness of utter exhaustion.  I stared at the scars from too tight shapewear that strained to give my bulges of womanhood – excess weight from having a child, losing a child, and having twins,  weight fluctuations, and genetics – into a form that somewhat aligned with the requirements of American society.  I flopped my “bat wings,” as my nanna calls them, knowing they would never lead me into flight.  I smirked at the faint remains of my “birth line;” a line that all the women in my family have that is our built-in pregnancy test which runs from the lower abdomen to the sternum and darkens once pregnant. I shake my head at the days when I didn’t know what it was or why it existed.  I regret many of the stretch marks that were not the result of my children but the result of seeking food as my solace because I didn’t have friends who would understand what it was like to be in my skin, in my economy, or in this world as me.  I marveled at the stories every inch told of a life imperfectly led and all the potential that lay before me in it.

Our bodies tell such grand stories.  They hold so many memories and moments, yet we dismiss them as machines or a necessary evil to be accepted as an “intelligent” species.  I have been guilty of being dismissive and cruel to my body, intentionally and unintentionally. I have even gone as far as starving it, poisoning it, cutting it and forcing it to be more like society says it should be.  I remember hearing growing up that God made me in His image, that He has known me since before I was born, and that I am part of Him just as He is part of me.  So, why do we – no, I – mistreat and dismiss something that is so precious?

While watching The Greatest Showman last week with my daughter for her birthday, these thoughts kept coming to me throughout the movie.  It led to my momentary pause of all the things I do to restructure who I am to be what I believe others want me to be.  But there is something unapologetically beautiful about all the characters in the movie that I found inspiring and wanted to embody.  Yes, I realize it is a prettied up version of P.T. Barnum and his evolution of the circus, but the overriding themes of self-acceptance, contentment in what you have, and the love of diversity really convicted me.

These characters and their story initially rang so true because I too often feel an oddity and out of place, but willing to put it on display because it feels less lonely in the spotlight.  I saw elements of myself in Lettie, the Bearded Lady, who has the beautiful voice but the world thinks is a horrific misstep of nature in her size and masculine face.  I knew the frustration of Anne and Phillip’s love that society disdained but felt so divine.  I relate to the fat man who feels much larger than he is.  And I humbly accept my similarity to P.T. Barnum who is always trying to prove himself to those who really matter the least, even though it feels like they matter the most.

The wonderful turn of events is, the gift of song, that has brought me to this stage has helped others share their oddity and malformations too.  I have witnessed a huddled mass of outsiders that feel rejected, unworthy and unloved make a beautiful rag-tag crew of love, dare I say, a family, in the wreckages of our lives through church and the gift of community there.  That is the beauty of God’s love – when practiced not just preached – which shows in how we view our bodies and those of others.  These shells that some covet and some cover are just temporary shells of the amazing gifts that God has put on this earth to share with one another.  Energy is constant, not the human form.  We are all connected by that energy to bring joy to each other. To revel in the odd and fantastic.  To admire the extreme and bizarre.  To embrace the strange and exotic.  To love the misshapen and grotesque.  We are all, at some point, one or more of these things to everyone else around us.  I am so glad God gives us so many chances to see how amazing and beautiful we all are.  It is amazing the fantastic and impossible things that can be possible when God brings together those whom the world would think make the unlikeliest team.  I am thankful for the creative as well as the stoic, the cheerleaders and the naysayers, the loving and the bigoted, the intelligent and the ignorant, as well as the righteous and the broken.  They are all beautiful souls and opportunities of love existing in beautiful bodies of varying mass and construct. How lucky we are to be apart of this circus.  And how grateful I am to finally see I am blessed to be part of it all.

About Natasha Smith

Natasha Smith works as an Assistant Director with KinderCare Learning Centers. Her passion is music and encouraging others to live up to their full potential and past societal expectations. When she is not working with children, she is either singing with Full Circle at Floris UMC, or creating new arrangements and songs as part of her acoustic duo, Sparrow.

Comments are closed.

Scroll To Top