Wednesday , 20 September 2017
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The Microclimate of Community

The Microclimate of Community

It was such a joy to share the sermon at Floris UMC this Sunday that I wanted to share an additional story that didn’t quite make the cut. For those of you who weren’t with us (or need help remembering), the main point came from John 13:31-35, in which Jesus told his disciples about a new commandment to love one another as a distinctive marker of Christian community. The disciples had a role to play in developing the climate in which they would continue to exist, grow and thrive in Christ. And, as we know, climate is crucial for things to grow.

The story I want to share further illustrates the importance of climate. In May 2007, my family faced a difficult transition. My parents had to leave Western New York (which has been their home for their entire lives) for my dad’s new job in North Carolina. As a teenager at the time, I found opportunities to connect with new people through school, church, etc. But we all faced some culture shock when we ‘Yankees’ moved to North Carolina. The climate, both cultural and physical, was challenging in so many ways, especially as we experienced heat and humidity like we had never known before. That summer was one of the hottest on record, and our AC unit (and new love) in our home simply couldn’t handle it. We had never had—or needed to have—air conditioning in our house before. But pretty soon after our move, we had to make a call to a repair company.

My mom and I were both home during the day when the repairman came. And let’s just say we had a hard time communicating. My mom (who had worked professional jobs in Western New York her whole life) and the repairman (who, to my memory, had been born and raised in rural North Carolina) simply couldn’t understand each other. The main cooling unit had rusted through, including a coil in the unit. As the repairman tried to tell my mom that he had to order a new coil (pronounced “coal”) for the unit, my mom looked back in disbelief, wondering why there was coal in the unit to begin with.

Luckily, I was able to finish the conversation with the repairman. As he left, I looked back at my mom expecting to laugh about the whole ordeal. But our joy rather quickly turned to sadness. The exchange plainly reminded us of how disconnected we felt, even in our own home. Just as a home with a broken AC unit in July can surround us with sweltering heat and humidity, disconnectedness and brokenness can surround us with anxiety and sadness. In more ways than one, our climate wasn’t necessarily conducive to our growth.

Don’t discount how your environment affects your life and don’t discount how you can contribute to your own environment. Perhaps you can be a climate changer for good, creating spaces at church, work or wherever you are that are conducive to your own growth and the growth of those around you.

About Jonathan Fuller

Jonathan Fuller is the fellows program coordinator at Floris UMC and a student at Wesley Theological Seminary. He and his wife, Abby, live in Fairfax, Virginia. They both love cooking, reading and the outdoors. Jonathan has a passion for leadership and experiential learning and is grateful to serve as a member of the Floris UMC staff and congregation.

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