Monday , 11 December 2017
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Sit Still – Really

Sit Still – Really

I think prayer may the the most difficult thing for me to practice – not the kind of prayer that thanks God for my blessings, acknowledges the beauty of creation, requests healing or help for others or even prayers of confession but the quiet, silent, listening prayer. As an extrovert meditation and contemplative prayer don’t come naturally, I’ve had to work at it.

 It’s a little like beginning an exercise program. I knew I needed to develop a practice of weight bearing exercises. I knew that it was critical to my well being; that it would help reduce my cholesterol and strengthen my bones. I also knew that there was no substitute for lifting weights. But none of this “knowing” was going to make it happen until I took the first step. As Jesus said to his disciples, “The spirit is willing, but the body is weak.”

Last December I started a regular practice of going to the gym. At first it was awkward. I felt like a novice, like I was doing everything wrong. Eventually I started to see progress. I could lift heavier weights. I began to really see the difference. Then I got my bloodwork back and I had concrete data that said this practice is changing things.

 Practicing meditative and centering prayer has been a similar experience for me. I knew in my head that I needed to do it, I just needed to make my body comply. At first I felt silly sitting in silence waiting for something to happen. Inevitably I would fill the void with my words then I would scold myself and feel like a failure. One day someone said to me, “Be nice to yourself. Be patient. It takes practice.” With that everything changed.

 Like going to the gym, I set aside time every morning to be still. I first read from the Bible then I practice my time of silence. Sometimes I put myself in the story, sometimes I think about a specific verse and sometimes I just sit in silence. At first I did this for about five minutes each day. Eventually as I have become more comfortable, my time has lengthened. Like going to the gym, I was encouraged when I started to see progress. My days are more peaceful and I am more aware of God’s presence in my life and the lives of those around me.

I still have much to learn about prayer but the practice of listening is changing things. Like going to the gym regularly for my physical health, I can’t imagine not spending time in silence for my spiritual health. Francois Fenelon said it this way, “The more you seek for God, the nearer He will be to you; every step that you take toward Him will bring you peace and consolation.”

About Cynthia Lopynski

Cynthia Lopynski served on the Floris UMC staff for 17 years and now works for the Alexandria/Arlington District Offices for the United Methodist Church in Northern Virginia. She has a passion for reaching new people for Christ and for vibrant, relevant, local churches. She is married to Jerry, and they have two daughters.

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